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North Korean Press Release on Nuclear Test



Full text of North Korea announcement:

North Korea said that on October 9, 2006, it had conducted its first nuclear weapons test. The text of the announcement by the country’s official Korean Central News Agency follows. The formal name for North Korea is the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea or DPRK, and KPA refers to the Korean People’s Army.

    “The field of scientific research in the DPRK successfully conducted an underground nuclear test under secure conditions on October 9, 2006, at a stirring time when all the people of the country are making a great leap forward in the building of a great, prosperous, powerful socialist nation. 

    “It has been confirmed that there was no such danger as radioactive emission in the course of the nuclear test as it was carried out under scientific consideration and careful calculation.

    “The nuclear test was conducted with indigenous wisdom and technology 100 percent. It marks a historic event as it greatly encouraged and pleased the KPA and people that have wished to have powerful self-reliant defense capability. 

    “It will contribute to defending the peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in the area around it.”

 

Points to consider:

1.      There is no pronoun “we” in the statement.

             From the workbook: 

If the pronoun “we” did not enter the statement it means that the person is likely to be under a lot of pressure. 

One might wonder why a statement over “success” should indicate pressure.

 

2.      The statement said: 

            “The field of scientific research in the DPRK…” 

            Please notice the following: 

a.      Please note that the statement does not attribute the success to the government of the DPRK but to one of the branches of this government. 

            This should be considered as an attempt to detach oneself from the event. 

            Question: if the test was successful why an attempt to detach? 

b.      “The field…” – without specifying which department or division actually did the test. 

Question: Is it possible that the divisions and/or departments refused to conduct the test?

3.      The statement said: 

“…successfully conducted an underground nuclear test under secure conditions on October 9, 2006 

            Please notice the following: 

a.    “…nuclear test…” – and not “nuclear explosion”.

b.    “…under secure conditions…” – this is an “unnecessary” comment and thus extremely important. 

“…under secure conditions…” sounds as if the text comes to assure the reader/listener that no harm was done.  However, if the “nuclear test” was conducted “successfully” then it is implied that no harm was done. 

4.      The statement said: 

            “…at a stirring time…” 

            The statement already noted the date.  By saying, “…at a stirring time…” the statement gives value judgment to the time of the test. 

5.      The statement said: 

            “…when all the people of the country…” 

            Please notice the following: 

a.    Again, the statement avoids taking the credit by the government.  This should be compared to other statements issued by the government of North Korea.

b.    “…the country…” – and not “our country”. 

                        One should check if the possessive pronoun exists in the Korean language. 

6.      The statement said: 

            “…are making a great leap forward in the building of a great, prosperous, powerful socialist nation.” 

            Please notice the following: 

a.    “…are making…” – and not “made”.  Past tense means it was done and over with.  “Are making” means that it is still in process.

b.    “…a great leap…” – and not “…the great leap…” – one would expect that moving into the nuclear club of countries will be “the” great leap.

c.    “…a great leap…” – and not “…a great move…” – the word “leap” indicates jumping over some steps, while the word “move” indicates subsequent steps.

d.    “…a great, prosperous, powerful socialist nation.” – the order of listing might reflect the order of priorities for the author of the statement. 

This means that “powerful” is listed only third, after “great” and “prosperous”.  One would expect that a nuclear “test” will definitely be under the category of “powerful” more than anything. 

e.    The mentioning of “socialist” at the end of the list indicates the low priority of the author of the statement to the socialist system.

f.      The change in language from “country” earlier to “nation” here. 

It is quite doubtful if the change in the language is justified by the sequence of events as they are described in the sentence.  If so, then the change in the language is not justified by the sequence of events as they are described in the sentence.  This lack of consistency in the language indicates that the statement does not come from the subject's memory, indicating that deception is present at this point in the statement.

7.      The statement said: 

“It has been confirmed that there was no such danger as radioactive emission in the course of the nuclear test…” 

Please notice the following: 

a.    Again, the statement talks about the danger and not about the success. 

b.    “It has been confirmed…” – passive language. 

                        The usage of passive language comes to conceal identity. 

c.    “…there was no such danger as…” – using “as” relates to some other unlisted dangers.

d.    “…in the course…” – one might wonder if there was any “radioactive emission” as a result of the test, but not “in the course” of the test. 

8.      The statement said: 

            “…as it was carried out under scientific consideration and careful calculation.” 

            Please notice the following: 

a.    “…as it was carried out…” –  

An open statement means that the subject reports to us "what happened" to him.  When the subject gives us the reason as to "why" something happened, the subject is outside the boundaries of the question.  Such information is considered "out-of-sequence" of events, since the statement only describes "what happened". 

The fact that the subject told us why something happened makes the sentence a very sensitive point for the subject and therefore a very important sentence.   

b.    “…as it was carried out…” – note the change of language from “conducted” earlier to “carried out” here. 

The change in the language is not justified by the sequence of events as they are described in the sentence.  This lack of consistency in the language indicates that the statement does not come from the subject's memory, indicating that deception is present at this point in the statement. 

c.    “…under scientific consideration…” – and not “with”.

d.    “…under scientific consideration…” – the statement started by saying that “The field of scientific research in the DPRK…” conducted the test.  Therefore, to say now that the test was “carried out” “under scientific consideration” is meaningless.

e.    “…under scientific consideration…” – and not “guidelines”.

f.      “…and careful calculation.” – one should note that the word “careful” is only assigned to the “calculation” but not for the “scientific consideration”. 

9.      The statement said: 

“The nuclear test was conducted with indigenous wisdom and technology 100 percent.” 

Please notice the following: 

a.      “…was conducted…” – after using once “carried out…” the statements returns to use “conducted” as in the beginning.

b.      “…was conducted…” – again, using passive language which comes to conceal identity.

c.      “…with indigenous wisdom…” – and not “under” as in the previous sentence.

d.      “…wisdom and technology…” – the order of listing might reflect the order of importance for the author.  “Wisdom” is more important than “technology”.

e.      “…with indigenous wisdom and technology 100 percent.” – and not “…with 100 percent indigenous wisdom and technology.”  By putting the “100 percent” at the end of the sentence, the author indicates the low importance of this fact. 

10.  The statement said: 

“It marks a historic event as it greatly encouraged and pleased the KPA and people that have wished to have powerful self-reliant defense capability.” 

Please notice the following: 

a.      “It marks…” – and not “It is…”

b.      “It marks…” – present tense.  Present tense avoids commitment to the past.

c.      “…a historic event…” – “a” indicates one out of many while such an event should be “the” event of history.

d.      “…a historic event…” – history is only an adjective to the “event”.  The subject of the sentence is the ‘event” and not “history” relegating history to a secondary if not even unimportant position.

e.      “…as it greatly encouraged and pleased…” – the order of listing makes “encouraged” more important than “pleased”.

f.        “…the KPA and people” – this is the first time the author binds the “KPA” and the “people” together.

g.      “…the KPA and people” – the order of listing makes the “KPA” more important than the “people”.

h.      “…that have wished…” – and not “…who have wished…” 

                        One should check this point in the Korean language. 

i.        “…that have wished…” – and not “…wished…”

j.        “…powerful self-reliant defense capability.” – “powerful” listed before ‘self-reliant” making “powerful” more important than “self-reliant”. 

11.  The statement said: 

“It will contribute to defending the peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula and in the area around it.” 

Please notice the following: 

a.      “It will contribute…” – and not “It contributes…” – using future tense comes to avoid commitment.

b.      “…defending the peace and stability…” – listing “peace” before “stability” making “peace” more important.

c.      “…on the Korean Peninsula and in the area around it.” – and not anywhere else.